derek listens to things.

Cheech & Chong’s last album, and the second LP I ever bought with my own money. Like my first purchase, I got it at Lindstrom’s Music in Louisville, OH in March or April 1994 for, I think, $2.95. I think it was on the weekend right before my 13th birthday that I took this album and Beelzebubba with me to my dad’s house to tape them on his stereo, since I didn’t own a record player at the time. 
Get Out Of My Room was also the title of a one hour home video release which featured music videos for four songs from the album (including “Born in East L.A.,” which I remember seeing on MTV several times) and mockumentary film segments. It used to only be available on VHS (I rented it and watched it exactly once in 1996), but we live in the future now and you can watch it on Netflix.

Cheech & Chong’s last album, and the second LP I ever bought with my own money. Like my first purchase, I got it at Lindstrom’s Music in Louisville, OH in March or April 1994 for, I think, $2.95. I think it was on the weekend right before my 13th birthday that I took this album and Beelzebubba with me to my dad’s house to tape them on his stereo, since I didn’t own a record player at the time.

Get Out Of My Room was also the title of a one hour home video release which featured music videos for four songs from the album (including “Born in East L.A.,” which I remember seeing on MTV several times) and mockumentary film segments. It used to only be available on VHS (I rented it and watched it exactly once in 1996), but we live in the future now and you can watch it on Netflix.

The first record I ever bought with my own money, for $4.95 at Lindstrom’s Music in Louisville, OH in the spring of 1994. I’m pretty sure I was still 12 years old. I have a distinct memory of two guys in the store talking Kurt Cobain’s overdose / coma in Rome, and I feel like it was on the day I bought this LP. Lindstrom’s was a fairly small music store in downtown Louisville that sold instruments, amps, guitar magazines and stuff, but also had a small inventory of CDs (mostly imports and grey market things, some current “alternative rock” stuff) and LPs (which seemed like what must have remained from some store’s stock after closing, but they also had all the new Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Helmet, Alice in Chains, etc. vinyl that was coming out at the time.) I think my motivation for purchasing it was having heard “Stuart” on a late-night “alternative music” program called Cool Tunes on Canton’s WRQK. I had previously been familiar with “Punk Rock Girl” from it’s run in MTV’s rotation when I was around 7, and with “Smokin’ Banana Peels” from its appearance on Beavis & Butthead and knowing that Lindstrom’s had a copy of this from seeing it there on previous visits, exposure to a third song from the same album was enough to make me purchase it the next time I was there. After I had gotten Big Lizard in My Backyard on CD in 1998, I went to Lindstrom’s again hoping by some chance they might still have those vinyl copies of the rest of the Dead Milkmen’s Enigma records output I remembered them having three years earlier, but the store was closed by then. I wish I bought more records there when I had the chance, but then I was only 12-13 years old at the time and didn’t really have money to speak of. I didn’t even have a record player when I bought this. I just wanted to hear the album, so I bought it with the intention of just taking it with me the next time I went to my dad’s for the weekend so I could make a tape of it on his stereo, which I did (along with the second and, later, third records I ever bought, also at Lindstrom’s, but those are stories for other times.) This is still the only Dead Milkmen vinyl I own, though I have everything they’ve released on CD (plus those 7” singles they’ve put out in the last couple of years.)
The Dead Milkmen are pretty much one of my favorite bands. Not my singular favorite band ever, although I have more than a couple friends and acquaintances for whom the Dead Milkmen is their favorite. In the event that anyone were curious, my favorite songs on the record are “Born to Love Volcanoes”, “”Punk Rock Girl”, “Bad Party”, “Sri Lanka Sex Hotel” and “Life is Shit.” And “Stuart” and “RC’s Mom.” On the other hand, “My Many Smells” is one of my bottom-of-the-list least favorite songs on any Dead Milkmen album. Also, holy crap, it’s been a few months longer than 20 years since I bought this record. Yikes.

The first record I ever bought with my own money, for $4.95 at Lindstrom’s Music in Louisville, OH in the spring of 1994. I’m pretty sure I was still 12 years old. I have a distinct memory of two guys in the store talking Kurt Cobain’s overdose / coma in Rome, and I feel like it was on the day I bought this LP. Lindstrom’s was a fairly small music store in downtown Louisville that sold instruments, amps, guitar magazines and stuff, but also had a small inventory of CDs (mostly imports and grey market things, some current “alternative rock” stuff) and LPs (which seemed like what must have remained from some store’s stock after closing, but they also had all the new Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Helmet, Alice in Chains, etc. vinyl that was coming out at the time.) I think my motivation for purchasing it was having heard “Stuart” on a late-night “alternative music” program called Cool Tunes on Canton’s WRQK. I had previously been familiar with “Punk Rock Girl” from it’s run in MTV’s rotation when I was around 7, and with “Smokin’ Banana Peels” from its appearance on Beavis & Butthead and knowing that Lindstrom’s had a copy of this from seeing it there on previous visits, exposure to a third song from the same album was enough to make me purchase it the next time I was there. After I had gotten Big Lizard in My Backyard on CD in 1998, I went to Lindstrom’s again hoping by some chance they might still have those vinyl copies of the rest of the Dead Milkmen’s Enigma records output I remembered them having three years earlier, but the store was closed by then. I wish I bought more records there when I had the chance, but then I was only 12-13 years old at the time and didn’t really have money to speak of. I didn’t even have a record player when I bought this. I just wanted to hear the album, so I bought it with the intention of just taking it with me the next time I went to my dad’s for the weekend so I could make a tape of it on his stereo, which I did (along with the second and, later, third records I ever bought, also at Lindstrom’s, but those are stories for other times.) This is still the only Dead Milkmen vinyl I own, though I have everything they’ve released on CD (plus those 7” singles they’ve put out in the last couple of years.)

The Dead Milkmen are pretty much one of my favorite bands. Not my singular favorite band ever, although I have more than a couple friends and acquaintances for whom the Dead Milkmen is their favorite. In the event that anyone were curious, my favorite songs on the record are “Born to Love Volcanoes”, “”Punk Rock Girl”, “Bad Party”, “Sri Lanka Sex Hotel” and “Life is Shit.” And “Stuart” and “RC’s Mom.” On the other hand, “My Many Smells” is one of my bottom-of-the-list least favorite songs on any Dead Milkmen album. Also, holy crap, it’s been a few months longer than 20 years since I bought this record. Yikes.

Soft Cell - “Tainted Love / Where Did Our Love Go” b/w “Memorabilia” and “Tainted Dub” 12-inch single

Soft Cell - “Tainted Love / Where Did Our Love Go”
b/w “Memorabilia” and “Tainted Dub” 12-inch single

2 Wide 4 Lipps - Four Thin Inches 7-inch EP
Another local obscurity. Hailing from Cleveland and Kent, this band’s first and only vinyl release came out in 1988, bearing songs about things that suck, like Deadheads, Reagan and Stryper. There’s no Discogs entry for this record, but an eBay listing claims there was one pressing of 500 copies, although the inner sleeve on this one is stamped #0501. Go figure.

2 Wide 4 Lipps - Four Thin Inches 7-inch EP

Another local obscurity. Hailing from Cleveland and Kent, this band’s first and only vinyl release came out in 1988, bearing songs about things that suck, like Deadheads, Reagan and Stryper. There’s no Discogs entry for this record, but an eBay listing claims there was one pressing of 500 copies, although the inner sleeve on this one is stamped #0501. Go figure.

Another little-known Cleveland outift. I was expecting something much weirder (maybe Pere Ubu-ish) than the somewhat bland new wave rock on this 1986 single (the B-side in particular reminded me a bit of Human Sexual Response, but not as interesting, nor as good.)

Another little-known Cleveland outift. I was expecting something much weirder (maybe Pere Ubu-ish) than the somewhat bland new wave rock on this 1986 single (the B-side in particular reminded me a bit of Human Sexual Response, but not as interesting, nor as good.)

Jane Aire & the Belvederes - “Breaking Through the Walls of Heartache” b/w “Life After You” UK 7-inch

Jane Aire & the Belvederes - “Breaking Through the Walls of Heartache” b/w “Life After You” UK 7-inch

Cleveland new wave garage rock circa 1980. This 2013 7-inch on Shake Your Ass contains one song from a compilation, both sides of their only single and three tracks from their first and only LP.

Cleveland new wave garage rock circa 1980. This 2013 7-inch on Shake Your Ass contains one song from a compilation, both sides of their only single and three tracks from their first and only LP.